All posts by Catherine Blake Smith

Dramaturg, director & playwright based in Seattle, WA.
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Its summertime, but the livin’ ain’t easy

This entry has been sitting in my drafts since early August. I’ve attempted to write it by thinking about it nearly every day since then, but have barely had the time to sit down and physically write it out.

I started a new job in mid-June that has completely turned my life around. Life is difficult, but this job is worth it and what I need right now. But this website is about my theatrical exploits, so I suppose I should update you on those instead.

Choosing Annex’s 2015 Season

In June we chose our season for 2015 at Annex. It was an arduous and exciting and dramatic process which I love more each year. I had two projects up for consideration, and one was chosen. By the end of the day, we had selected 7 out of 8 projects so we spent the next week deciding on the missing slot. We will be announcing our entire season as soon as I complete the draft of the season announcement.

Spin the Bottle

My biggest news is that starting in 2015, I will produce Spin the Bottle. For 17 years, Bret Fetzer has been producing and curating this monthly cabaret. I am overjoyed to take it over.

There was an article written up in the Capitol Hill Seattle Blog about the history of Spin the Bottle and the legacy Bret leaves behind. I have lots of thoughts about curating and hope to maintain many traditions while introducing some of my own. Please read the article and share it with others! I’ll be excited to share my first curation in January 2015.

1448 Outdoors

For this, I was band liaison on the second day of the first weekend in mid-August. It was fun. Apparently I brought some tactics to liaising that the Friday person did not, but that people on the following week did. Success! (I think they came up with the tactics on their own, though.) I got to hang out in the sunshine with a bunch of cool people, making sure they were able to hear the songs they would sing snippets of that night (lots of searching for YouTube videos and lyrics) and that they were tracking all of their ideas. I created and printed show sheets, which were a big hit.

In general, I had a great time. It was an exhausting day though, and didn’t allow me to enjoy the theatre I had supported making that day. By the time we got to the performances, I was so tired I didn’t pay attention as much as I would have liked to. The outdoor setting also made it difficult to hear. However, I loved volunteering for the festival and would love to participate again in the festival. It’s a loving and encouraging environment.

Gregory Awards Nominator (shh)

I am a Gregory Awards Nominator for the 2014-2015 season. Starting in August every year, Theatre Puget Sound sends out theatre makers and lovers around Seattle and the surrounding areas to gather feedback about locally produced shows. I get free tickets to productions then I rate them for the moderator. I am also not allowed to write about any of the productions anywhere, which is unfortunate. It means I will continue to seek out shows that are not a part of the nomination process because I want to keep writing here. (Check out my breakdown of John Roderick’s Rendezvous from Tuesday!)

I’m involved with several other projects, including:

Blood Countess (written by Kelleen Conway Blanchard and directed by Bret Fetzer–I’m assistant directing

Zapoi! written by Quinn Armstrong and directed by Kaytlin McIntyre–I’m dramaturging

Horse Girls written by Jenny Rachel Weiner and directed by Norah Elges (opens October 28)–I’m production managing

And some other new works opportunities I’m excited and scared about.

Stay tuned!

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John Roderick’s Rendezvous

Tuesday night, I attended John Roderick’s Rendezvous, which was a treat and a blast. I had been planning to attend since the first announcement, but was not able to until a couple weeks into the second “semester.” But what is John Roderick’s Rendezvous? The Rendezvous is a Belltown bar and theatre space in Seattle (currently under ownership transition). John Roderick is a singer/songwriter/philosopher/historian/opinion-haver/gentleman who has decided to produce his own program there on a semi-weekly basis. Roderick’s Rendezvous is the perfect platform for Mr. Roderick to perform as he prefers.

The structure of the show is simple: the stage is set to Mr. Roderick’s design, the audience is allowed in a half-hour before the show time to choose their seats and check in with each other (“Have you been to the show before? Who else has he had on?”), an assistant makes announcements and gives an introduction, Mr. Roderick enters and speaks for about ten-minutes, he introduces his guest for the evening, he interviews the guest about their profession and other interesting topics, they speak about their sartorial choices, have a Q + A with the audience, and then they close with a geography question from a regular audience member. No music, some philosophy, and lots of conversation.

Mr. Roderick conversed last night with a long-time friend of his, Tina Meadows, who was there to exemplify citizenship. (It appears that every show has a loose “theme” that Mr. Roderick uses to inspire his initial speech, chosen guest, and interview questions.) Mr. Roderick pointed out that when he and Ms. Meadows met, they had been “occupying the same space for some time” but had only just met then. They should have known each other, but did not, and once they did, it was if they’d known each other forever. I have had this type of encounter before in Seattle, and I find it simultaneously unnerving and comforting. You soon realize that although you wish you had known this person before the moment of meeting, that you met when it was time to meet. The meeting is synchronous in a beautiful way.

Speaking on being a citizen in society and its implications, Mr. Roderick emphasized “coercive citizenship,” which is often a failure. For those who like to live against the grain, being forced into a method of living is ineffective. But being coerced is a proven method that allows the free-thinking individual to arrive at his own conclusions, in the end emphasizing the overall benefits to society. Not to say that one person who doesn’t fall in line will ruin it for the rest of us, but that an attempt to live independently isn’t always the best way to live. He used a specific example of having his driver’s license taken as punishment for returning a UW canoe back late. Although he was able to function in local society without a driver’s license, after some time it became blatantly obvious that he would have to have a photo identification in order to continue to participate in society: specifically the society of friendship.

Annex Theatre survives with participative citizenship. With every meeting, we emphasize that the people in the room are the people who will make the decisions and that everyone is there of their own volition. There is no need to have requirements of anybody (requirements are not the same as expectations) because to ask that of a volunteer will result in no participation at all. Because Annex is an “anarcho-democratic collective,” we are in a way a micro example of society as Mr. Roderick illustrated it. Most of the time we all obey traffic laws and queue in a line because we are told that if we do not, there will be severe consequences, but Mr. Roderick pointed out that “once upon a time” those who lived outside of society (Daniel Boone being the example) did not live outside the law. Now there is no room to live “outside of the law” because as people have spread out within the finite space (specifically the United States of America) the government has had to spread out too.

As Ms. Meadows came out, I continued to think about Mr. Roderick’s point about citizenship and choosing/being forced to participate. As we got to know the guest, we learned that Ms. Meadows has always chosen to participate on whatever path was given to her, enabling her to become a successful electrical engineer who has helmed some impressive projects. They also spoke about Charles Krafft, a local artist who has recently been dismissed because he is a Holocaust denier and who apparently has a secret society that Mr. Roderick joined a number of years ago.

As a theatre experience goes, it nearly isn’t, except that the two people onstage are certainly performing as we all do in front of others. On his podcast, Roderick on the Line, he is gruff and long-winded and paternal. In person he is gregarious and affectionate. Onstage he is also generous but sharp and sparkling, knowing that others are bathing in his magnificence. Although he draws other people of high intellect into his orbits, the audience was rapt with attention. Very few people spoke back to him, and when people became excited about correcting him, he was already three steps ahead of them: catching his mistake, knowing others would correct him, and urging them not to (zppt!). We all put on airs to participate, we all get up and put on our clothes, ride the bus, standing when we’re told to, and we know that following the rules allows us to remain free while improving the existence of those around us. But what happens when we’re no longer free?

The room at the Rendezvous in the Jewelbox Theatre is a sacred space for (in the month of September) weekly meetings where we can join Mr. Roderick as citizens who know that we are there for the betterment of all. See John Roderick’s Rendezvous for yourself; tickets are only $10.

performance notes

  • The vulnerability of Mr. Roderick and his guest in such an intimate setting was overwhelmingly comforting and I look forward to finding dates to attend as autumn and winter come because it feels much more like a winter show.
  • The set looked amazing: a podium (lectern) made of salvaged wood, two green-yellow leather mid-century modern chairs, and a centerpiece of wilting beet greens and an artichoke in a mason jar.
  • If continuing to use the podium, I suggest moving the microphone in front of it, since Mr. Roderick has a wide wingspan and gestures while speaking.
  • In the interview, Ms. Meadows asked who else had been on the show, and Mr. Roderick realized that everyone was one of his friends, so it had all been white people around the age of 45. Suggestions for non-white interviewees: Valerie Curtis-Newton, Kathy Hsieh, Bob Williams, Ansel Herz (these are all people I’d be interested in learning more about from Mr. Roderick’s perspective).
  • Having people on the show who are not intimately connected with Mr. Roderick will enable the guest to have more needs to speak, and Mr. Roderick to listen.

Also, this happened!

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Robert Bergin as Harrison and Norman Newkirk (in reflection) as James. Dangerpants Photography.

Theatrical Impression: Terre Haute by Bridges Stage Company at ACT Theatre

Terre Haute is not my type of play. Two men sitting in a room just talking can intrigue me from time to time, but for me it works if there is banter, humor, and familiarity.  In Terre Haute–the fictional meeting between Gore Vidal and Timothy McVeigh in the days before McVeigh’s execution–a familiarity grows between the two men that left me not knowing how to feel about the subject matter and the play itself. We can never know anything for sure, hence the effectiveness of terrorism, but I left the theatre sure that whatever my issues with the subject matter of the play, it was well-produced.

I think I was around 8 when McVeigh bombed the federal building in Oklahoma City. I don’t remember much about it, except that my classmates and I were taught what to do in the event of a bomb scare. Crouching down under our desks became included in our repertoire along with filing quietly single file into the windowless hallways in the event of a tornado. But being in southern Missouri, we were close to the events. I’m sure I knew people who were connected in some way, but growing up, I never knew the reasons behind McVeigh’s terrorism. As I came of age, there was the Columbine School shooting, September 11th 2001, and I just didn’t focus on the reasons why.

So Terre Haute was enlightening to say the least. Edmund White, the playwright, only changes the names of the characters from the people he based the play on. The location, the details of McVeigh’s bomb, all of it is pulled directly from true events, but the names are changed. I can guess as to why, and know that it didn’t matter, because we all knew whose story we were watching.

Well, at first the story was clear to me. As the play progressed, it became more about the attraction of the older man to the younger, and during the talkback following, I came up with a possible reason why. The playwright wrote the play for a young man he had a crush on, who happened to look like Timothy McVeigh. The piece apparently was a vehicle for this look-alike performer to act. While I don’t doubt there could have been a taboo physical/mental/sensual/emotional attraction between the two men had they ever met in real life, letting it become the focal point of the play made me wonder why choose the backdrop of such a real and powerful event?

I suppose there are arguments for and against: use the true events of the Oklahoma City bombing and audiences have something to grasp onto and comprehend the relationship against. Create other events and the events become circumspect and put under scrutiny, instead of maintaining focus on the exchange between the two men.

Regardless, the final image of the play–the one Robert Bergin said made him want to perform the role–fell flat for me. The talkback that followed only served to frustrate me as the topic strayed from what could have been effective discussion (common for talkbacks) and it turned into a lot of speculation. What if there had been no daycare center at the federal building? Would McVeigh have been considered a revolutionary hero, taking a stand against his government?

I abhor murder and terror and war and the military and guns vehemently, so I would argue “no, not in the slightest, he still murdered hundreds of innocent people” but perhaps you have a different opinion. Seeing this play will make you think. You may think about what is terror, will we ever know the consequences of our government’s actions, where you may have been when Timothy McVeigh bombed the Murrah building in Oklahoma City.

If that intrigues you, go. Terre Haute runs until June 15 with the Central Heating Lab at ACT Theatre, produced by Bridges Stage Company.

photo by Paul Bestock

Theatrical Impression: Arcadia at Seattle Public Theater

Sex and literature and science and death and paper trails, does any of it matter?

A week ago, a friend of mine from college passed away unexpectedly. He was a poet. He wrote absurd and hilarious haikus alongside immensely deep creative original postmodern works and translations. He was genius, taken too early from this world. Facebook allows you to memorialize a user’s page now, and friends of the deceased can post memories and photos, etc. On this person’s page, people are posting his poetry. I posted a photograph of an autographed piece I’m lucky to have: a photocopied page out of his notebook that says ‘Bonnie and Clyde’ on the left face and ‘Amerika’ on the right face, each repeated fifteen times. A friend of mine called it a “treasure,” and it is. Everything he left behind is now a treasure, a paper trail for us to follow again and again and find new meanings in.

Seeing Arcadia at Seattle Public Theater (soon to be renovated, donate here) Thursday night hit me in a special way. As I walked home, I began to put together the parallel. In the circumstances of the play and the mystery surrounding my friend’s passing, only paper remains.

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Max and Paul Gude on their first date (spoiler: Paul read his entire children's book and Max chose Paul #adorable)

Theatrical Impression: April into May Round-Up

I suck.

I have been seeing plays since the end of March (it’s now mid-May!?!) and have just not been writing about them.

Why?

I produced some of the shows. or I saw them at the end of a run. and I saw one not in St. Paul, MN. also, I’ve been dating. and I’ve been putting together my proposals for Annex. but mostly, I suck.

Writing is a good practice. In 2014, I have not been writing as much as I would like. Every few weeks I try to start a practice of writing every day, but I don’t do it. Dissatisfaction in other areas of my life has led me to come up with a whole list of excuses, and none are valid. So here, today, now, I’m going to write a round-up. A quick, little-detailed summary of all of the shows I saw since the end of March. Here we go.

The Importance of Being Earnest at Seattle Shakespeare

This play was fun. The casting was delightful–especially having married couple Connor Toms and Hana Lass in kitty corner roles of Cecily and Jack–and the actors had a great gasp on the language. Quinn Franzen was certainly my favorite for the role of Algernon. The set was lovely, and the costumes were a treat to see. Overall, it was pure candy. I also may have laughed too hard, causing an older gentleman in front of me to turn around a few times as I snorted at the genius of Oscar Wilde.

I curated the April Edition of Spin the Bottle at Annex

I had a great time! And what an honor to produce an evening of my favorite monthly late-night cabaret that happens on every first Friday of the month (next up, June 6 by Scotto Moore!). I got to put together my perfect list of people to participate, then deal with cancellations, special requests, and schedule rearrangements up to the last minute. It was all worth it. We had a good showing house, thankfully. One group had 11 people in it, which always boosts attendance. The night was packed, and very theatre-heavy. I also had a lot of boys, apparently, from all-male speed-dating improv, male smut, a male host, male musicians, poetry and plays by male-identified people… overall a very masculine and telling night of my preferences: men and words.

Moisture Festival at Hale’s Palladium

A friend of mine gave me a free ticket to this show, and to the late night one at 10:30 pm. Unfortunately, I had worked an early day on Friday, then had a late night with Spin the Bottle before, worked again, and had to be up at 6:30 on Sunday morning for work… plus I was getting to sick. Unfortunately, I had to leave after intermission. I got to see a magician, an aerialist, and more. It seemed like a charged evening of comedy, classic and raunchy and new, and I look forward to going next year.

Moby Alpha by Charles at Ballard Underground

Oh yeah, I saw the shit out of this show. And I wrote about it. But apparently my post never posted because I was trying to type it on my iPad while at work, with no internet access. I’ll have to find it later and post it.

Behind the Eye at Park Square Theatre in St. Paul, MN

This play was pretty great. Weird, but great. I was visiting a friend, and she took me to the theatre where she used to work box office. It reminded me of Taproot Theatre in Seattle: small and elegant and clean space, not fringe-y, but not a big repertory house. Park Square Theatre does new and old plays, and Behind the Eye was pretty recently developed. The topic was great–a Vogue model turned WWII photographer deals comes to terms with the end of her life–but I found the style of the play tedious and difficult to follow. There was no intermission, and was, in essence, a one-woman show. There were other characters, and other actors, but the other actors had minimal parts. I wonder what it would have been like to have the sole actress play all of the parts? Some sexual-tension moments would have been lost, but not much else besides. It would have also supported the idea that this woman was entirely self-obssessed, neglecting her two husbands and child just in pursuit of the perfect photograph. As the sole performer, we would have seen her on focus: herself.

Chaos Theory at Annex Theatre, PWYC Industry Night

Yes, I was working. Yes, I produced this show. But, it is great. You have 3 more nights left to see Courtney Meaker’s latest foray into comedic/dark writing and Keiko Green’s fierce, fierce performance. GO.

King Lear at Seattle Shakespeare Company

I was going to write about this play last week. Really, truly, I was. But by Monday as I was recovering from a crazy weekend of work and play, I thought, what’s the point? Lear is one of my favorite Shakespeare plays, and it is close to my heart. But this production didn’t make me feel anything. I had very few visceral reactions, even to a gun being pulled out onstage. I didn’t feel so far away from the stage, even being in the last row, but nothing from the actors reached out and grabbed me. The play overall was not very interesting to watch, and Amy Thone–as much as I love, admire, and respect her and her craft–was barely audible and therefore a sucking void onstage. Perhaps it was the Sunday matinee performance, the weird weather and exhaustion of doing a full weekend run. Who knows? But the actor playing Lear was good and some of the costumes worked, in a weird way. Except for Regan’s. Her costume was a bizarre jersey-knit that rode up in what looked like an uncomfortable way. Overall, meh.

Gone Wild: A Savage Romp Through the Animal Kingdom at Annex

Oh, my god. I also helped produce this show, but I wish I had posted this before they closed because this show was amazing. The Libertinis are a neo-burlesque performance group, but also some of the most courteous, friendly, just-plain-excited-to-be-alive-and-making-art-artists I’ve ever had the pleasure of encountering. Super crazysexycool show.

One-Minute Play Festival at ACT Theatre

Again, a meh. I didn’t have high expectations, after speaking with several of the artists involved. Every year, twice a year, 1448 Projects does a similar and better thing, so I also knew 1MPF could not achieve similar production values. However, some of the plays were well-written, others were well-directed, and I had a great night. I’d be interested to see if this production is done again in Seattle, and what it will look like then.

Shows I missed because of work, exhaustion, other plans, etc.:

Tails of Wasps by New Century Theatre Company
Seattle Vice by Mark Siano and Opal Peachey
Attempts on her Life by The Horse in Motion
Impenetrable by SIS Productions
Quickies by Live Girls! Theater
Baron Samedi at On the Boards

What have you been seeing this spring? And what are you excited about seeing this summer? I’d love to hear.

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Theatrical Impression: Gidion’s Knot at Seattle Public Theater

My neighborhood theatre with the best view – Seattle Public Theater at the bathhouse on Green Lake – is producing Gidion’s Knot by Johnna Adams. This play has thrown me and my perceptions for a loop this past week, and I *love* it. Regardless of what I perceived was wrong about the script or whatever, I think it’s important for Seattle audiences to see this play. Rebecca Olson (the teacher) and Heather Hawkins (simply amazing as the mother) landed a fantastic opening night and the play runs for three more weekends. But even a terrific acting performance can skew my perceptions of a script that is convoluted and confusing at times.

Strong, Immersive Staging

First off, the staging and set design were fantastic. See this play and sit right up close to get the experience. It’s worth it. I was sitting right next to the only entrance, behind the teacher’s desk. I felt like a fly on the wall, like I was actually in the 5th grade classroom and able to observe the scene between Gidion’s mother and teacher as they discussed Gidion’s fate and untimely demise.

Being immersed in the staging meant I not only had to be an accountable audience member (tuck my legs in, look attentive), but it also meant that when the mother would speak to the teacher, it was like she was speaking directly to me. I was also close to the impeccable set dressings. Ashley Banker (props designer) made exquisite posters about mythology and put other detailed touches on the set that were a fun visual game to look at.

Also, the staging was well done. I was sitting in what could have been considered a very bad seat, and it just wasn’t. Both actresses were aware of their sight lines, staying visible as they warred from separate sides of the classroom. The shape of the stage Seattle Public allows the producers play with traditional theatre in a non-traditional way. Doing a play that could very well be done in a proscenium stage in a nearly three-quarter set-up was a strong choice and served the play well. I like the contrast between the hyper-realism of being in a classroom and the hyper-awareness that we are all here, watching a play.

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St Vincent [Concert] at The Moore

Last night, I had the amazing opportunity to see St Vincent play live at The Moore in Seattle. I have been a fan of St Vincent since college, and once I realized I had the chance not only to go to a live concert in Seattle but to go see HER, I knew it had to be. (Working in theatre PLUS my work schedule precludes me from being able to attend most live concerts, meaning last year I missed out on Nada Surf and The Long Winters.) What I experienced last night was unlike any live concert I have ever seen. Everyone in my balcony was (mostly) seated. At times, I wanted to get up and dance, but I knew to do so would be to tear my eyes away, and that was the last thing I wanted.

St Vincent is a visceral, practiced explosion that demands attention, and forces the viewer and listener to experience Annie Clark on her own terms. I find this more than admirable; it’s fucking aspirational.

Precise Playlist

I’m sure St Vincent’s Digital Witness Tour is like nothing else she has ever done. (How long has she been doing choreography to her songs when performing live?) Videos of her in years past and anecdotes I have heard from friends described her as more frenetic and photos show as her a brunette waif who would surprise beyond shy smiles. Now, the St Vincent American Digital Witness Tour is a commanding, well-crafted theatrical performance piece. There is nothing onstage that is not useful, therefore there is nothing superfluous. Guitars, microphones, and theremins were never onstage until they had to be. Even when guitars didn’t need to be onstage, they were removed by a dedicated tech.

There is no set list on the stage, because everyone in the group knows what will come next. I appreciated this precision, because it speaks close to my heart. St Vincent had a script, and they followed it, perfectly memorized. Twenty songs, three poems, one introduction, and a single costume change. [OMG all I want is a picture of her performing "Strange Mercy" in that  amazing shoulder-bound crop top mini-skirt ensemble please] Even though I never knew what song would come next, I soon learned to trust Annie Clark and the band. They had chosen the best songs from her catalogue of four albums. They placed them in a perfect order, that I could never have imagined. And I can’t picture it any other way.

Expression Within Constraints

My coworker (also a fan of St Vincent and a talented career musician) pointed out that with such constraint to be performed over and over again, where is the spontaneity? Music, more than theatre, thrives on the spontaneous and human nature infused into the performance. The musicians onstage are not typically playing a character separate from themselves. However, this isn’t really true for Annie Clark/St Vincent, is it? Annie Clark is choosing to perform as St Vincent, so why shouldn’t the character be an android-like guitar-shredding goddess who forces us to watch when and how she wants? 

The spontaneity comes from the same place an actor finds spontaneity performing the same play three nights a week for five weeks in a row. There is a comfort in restraint. Performers who have a repeated pattern so well practiced can do their choreography and lyrics and guitar licks as second nature. I’m sure there was improvisation to the night during the poetry/patter, guitar solos, and certainly during the writhing onstage for “Krokodil.” The light board operator and band knew the points where would return, so they knew to wait and let her play how she would until then.

Besides the constraints of choreography – even during moments where you could expect her and her guitarist, Toko Yasuda, to improvise moments because there was nothing “set,” they were either still or precisely moved to the beat – St Vincent found times to be spontaneous. Not only during the writhing of “Krokodil” (part of the encore/costume change portion) but earlier, during “Prince Johnny,” as she slowly rolled down her platform to arrive in a reverse crucifix. Rolling down a huge box platform takes presence of mind required by performers who have marks to hit but know that every night will be slightly different. As she slowly rolled down the pink tiered platform, I was laughing. As soon as she hit her pose,  I was thinking about the bigger message she was conveying.

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JOHN GLEESON

Then black out.

Blinding Lights

Every song ended with a quick black out. There were only a couple of slow fades, but in between every song, they performers used the opportunity to shift places onstage and begin each number with mystery about the transitions. In between the black outs were flashy-as-hell lights. I felt like I was underwater, in a night club, under the assault of high beams, and everything in between. The lights were gorgeous. They reflected off of her gray hair and the white outfits of the band and the pale pink tiered platform in a gorgeous way. Despite her appearing in darkness to me up in the balcony, I could see where the foot lights were going to make some gorgeous photos. Brooklyn Benjestorf at The Stranger got some GEMS:

BROOKLYN BENJESTORF
BROOKLYN BENJESTORF
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BROOKLYN BENJESTORF
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BROOKLYN BENJESTORF

No Patter, Only Poetry

St Vincent did not speak until after her third song. Throughout the night, she only spoke four times: three “Poems for Seattle” (that’s what I’m calling them) and band introductions before her final final song. Every time she spoke, it was perfect. A friend of mine who was at the show is convinced the pieces were improvised, as am I, because some of them were very specific to Seattle. She began the first by saying that she felt like we were all similar to her growing up, then proceeded to describes scenes from our lives as Seattle-ites. “…And once when you were single, you went to the house from Singles, and shed a single tear… I actually did that.”

At the end, she said she was happy to have gotten to know every single one of us and it made me feel warm and fuzzy, despite not knowing this character or performer hardly at all. In my admiration for her sense of privacy and self-awareness of how to cultivate and maintain a performance character, I often find myself thinking about how well any of us truly know each other. We all choose what to express and how and when to express it. Each and every one us controls how and when people see us. St Vincent reminds us to embrace and harness  this power.

Result: Eviscerated

St Vincent, despite being a “girl in rock music,” will shred your fucking face off. This one of the reasons she is amazing, along with the exquisite beauty, indelible mystery, impenetrable lyrics, wicked rhythms, sweet melodies, etc. But sometimes I think it is the face-shredding that is the most important. St Vincent’s American Digital Witness Tour is a visceral experience, like an opera.

As the night progressed – culminating in the most EPIC performance of “Your Lips Are Red” from her 2007 album and she didn’t even do the whole song – she got more wild, expressing herself within the constraints more and more. Her movements, still choreographed, became more and more wild. Then black out. And the guitar parts became unreal. She bent over, jerked her legs, shuffled around the stage, and continued to perform as precisely as when she first began but there was something new, something unleashed. It was like she stuck a knife in my gut, exposing the deepest underbelly of my emotions…

BROOKLYN BENJESTORF
BROOKLYN BENJESTORF

…while never exposing any part of herself. She is a true surgeon, and I love her.

St Vincent at The Moore in Seattle, March 26, 2014.

Theatrical Impression: 7 Minutes in Heaven Improv Show

After seeing Raymond Williams’s 7 Minutes in Heaven improv show last Friday night I felt elated, excited, and eager. I traditionally feel this way after good improv shows. I get hyped up when I have the chance to see actors fully immerse themselves into characters. The advantage of the long-form 7 Minutes is that these actors only discover the nuances of their characters through discussion with others. The element of surprise is ever-present, and that makes it just plain fun.

7 Minutes in Heaven at Seattle Creative Arts Center
7 Minutes in Heaven at Seattle Creative Arts Center

7 Minutes is improvised speed-dating. Williams has produced it in a variety of environments with a bunch of different actors, so my first time was their first time in that space (Seattle Creative Arts Center), with that group. Williams also doesn’t know who the characters will be before they arrive, but trusts the actors to bring in someone they’ve been cultivating. There is some structure to the evening overall, but because no one knows who anyone else is, there is plenty of opportunity for surprise.

Set up like regular speed dating, the characters enter the space ready to mingle with each other and the audience. Then they take their seats. Not every character has the chance to meet, because then the show would be about two hours long (or more). Instead, one set of characters stay seated as the other half rotate to the different tables. They each have seven minutes to chat and rate each other. The audience can choose which dates to watch and for how long.

I opted to bounce around, getting close to tables but sometimes staying within ear shot of neighboring tables so I could eavesdrop on several conversations at once. The urge to participate was overwhelming. The audience were specifically instructed not to participate in the dates if they had not “paid the registration fee.” We did get to play with the characters during the open mingle before the dates started,  but otherwise we were in full observation mode. But being given the opportunity to walk around, watch a character or interaction that seemed funny/interesting/weird made the experience so enjoyable. I got to craft my own evening of entertainment. How often do you get to say that?

This interaction happened right behind me. I caught it in my periphery.
This interaction happened right behind me. I caught it in my periphery.

After the dates, the daters choose their matches. It was naturally hilarious. I wasn’t rooting for anyone in particular, but I was especially pleased when the guy who was 10-years married and the dark poet found a match in each other. Another character chose her boyfriend Ric, who silently followed her around the entire evening. Another declared that because we are all human and all connected, “Yes.”

 

The contrast between a traditional theatre introduction and the speed dating atmosphere clashed in a way I did not like. I wanted to feel like I was in an awkward speed dating event from the moment I walked in the door. I think encouraging the house manager to play along and having a host character would allow Williams to fully step into the producer role. The house manager could act like they’ve been roped into hosting this awkward evening and the host could create his/her own character to play along with the other actors. Then Williams could be the point person for producing the show. I think the result would be a seamless evening of awkwardness, which is a fun place to be.

I’m excited to see this show again. Knowing there will be different characters and a different environment will keep it fresh! The next performance is scheduled for late April or May, but I don’t know the exact date. Will update when I know more.

And kudos to the newly created Pocket Theater for producing. They’re doing a variety of improvised shows, sketch comedy, stand-up comedy, and fringe theatre, providing a new venue for Seattle theatre. It’s fucking awesome.

Photo by Michael Brunk / nwlens.com

Theatrical Impression: THIRD at ArtsWest

I knew little about THIRD and playwright Wendy Wasserstein as I headed to ArtsWest last Thursday. As a student who attended a midwest liberal arts university, I knew the basics: Crimes of the Heart (managed to conflate Acting II scene studies and misremembered which plays we did), Wendy Wasserstein is an important female American playwright… and that’s about it. The reason I wanted to go came down to the director, Peggy Gannon. What I ended up seeing was a decent evening of theatre that left me with amazing feelings about Peggy’s ability to rise to the space’s staging challenges, Marty Mukhalian is UH-MAZING, and meh about Wendy Wasserstein.
Bill Higham and Marty Mukhalian. I teared up. Photo by Michael Brunk / nwlens.com
Bill Higham and Marty Mukhalian. I teared up. Photo by Michael Brunk / nwlens.com

I get why audiences like Wasserstein plays. All of the jokes and commentary are on point: a clothing-optional dormitory, asking Third if he’s a Republican again and again, the bitter sweetness of a man’s mind as it deteriorates, and the political-university climate of the US in 2003. But it didn’t leave me feeling good, I felt empty. I wanted more. I wanted to dig deeper into the deteriorating father and his relationship with his daughter, the professor. I wanted to know more about the professor’s tense yet loving and adoring relationship with her own daughter. The family interested me the most, but it was the secondary story. But that’s not what the play was about, because it’s about the professor’s unfounded rampage on a student she barely knows. I got bored with Third, the catalyst, mostly because he never changed. He’s not supposed to. He was onstage to create an opportunity for the professor to change. Every time he came onstage he repeated a similar sentiment to the point where I equally dreaded his final scene and highly anticipated it because I knew the professor would give me much-needed closure. 

My seats in the house could have greatly contributed to my simultaneous feelings of satisfaction and emptiness. ArtsWest has a semi-thrust arrangement, with seats directly on the sides of the stage. I ended up house right, staring directly at the side of the set and characters. Peggy’s staging was impressive for the challenges she had from the set and the semi-thrust arrangement. (The set could have been pushed upstage about two feet to give the side houses a chance to see at an angle.) I rarely felt left out of a scene, except at the very end, and then only for a moment. The actors excelled at making sure everyone felt included. But how much of the story was lost to me because I wasn’t seeing it dead on? Looking at the press photos, everything looks unfamiliar because I didn’t see the play that way, I saw everything from the side. I think that would certainly encourage a feeling of being “left out.” Did my house right seat enable me as a “bystander” instead of an “engaged audience member?”  THIRD is such a realistic play–despite direct audience addresses and one surreal moment–that maybe it needs to be performed in a straight-on proscenium style stage.

Regardless, I stepped away from THIRD happy that I had had the opportunity to see Peggy’s work again, blessed to have been in Marty Mukhalian’s presence, and aware that a Wendy Wasserstein play is not my personal aesthetic.

THIRD plays through March 22 at ArtsWest in West Seattle.

Spin the Bottle – March Smut (2014)

At Spin the Bottle tonight, I will read my third ever smut piece. I’m calling it “Foodie Sex.”

I was recently dumped. Or something. It’s difficult to discern what happened exactly, since it all happened over text message, but one of my OkCupid dates self-imploded quicker than I thought possible. And about two weeks into our “relationship,” I realized we had never  truly eaten together. In the short time that I knew this person, we were physically intimate three times and I consumed this short list of food in his presence:

  • one-quarter of an apple
  • three slices of cheese
  • probably about four crackers
  • a chocolate-covered salted caramel infused with cannabis
  • two hunks out of a wedge of brie
  • three or four spreadings of an olive tapenade
  • a few more crackers
  • a bite of a chocolate chip cookie
  • a hunk of dark chocolate with almonds

That was over the span of three “dates.” The more I thought about how he and I interacted, the more I realized how precious and sacred food is in a relationship.

For a couple of weeks while I was seeing this person, I was dating someone else too. The second guy and I ate frequently together: from food trucks, late night gourmet food at cocktail bars, hungover brunch where I was wiping up my yolks with  toast, at a fusion restaurant with copious amounts of beer and even though he and I were barely intimate, I still feel like I knew him better.

Eating alone is considered unhealthy for longevity, and my living situation often leaves me sitting in front of my iPad with a plate on my lap, staring blankly ahead of me. So I crave eating meals with others, I yearn for conversation about ingredients and cooking methods, and I want to share those intimate moments with everyone I meet. It makes sense that I would especially desire to share the intimacy of eating with the person I take on as my lover.

So this smut story is about food and sex and intimacy. And it includes a Seinfeld reference. Win!

Foodie Sex

There are some boys around whom you do not eat. Max was one of those boys. He had a body like a tree trunk: steady and unyielding and a furry layer of hair all over his body that I just loved to nuzzle my nose into. Really, I didn’t even need to eat, because when we were together, the sex was enough. Well, almost enough.

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